Do IP cameras require ethernet connection to router?

A bit confused here. For installation of an IP camera, the videos I have seen show wiring an Ethernet cable from the router to the camera. For some reason, I was under the assumption these could be powered and not wired all the way to the router. Am I mistaken? I have an area of my house that would be damn near impossible to send an ethernet cable to. I was hoping to share power from an ourdoor light and this think would connect to my home’s wifi wireless.

Thanks,

It depends on the IP camera. Some are wired ethernet only, others support both wired ethernet and WiFi connections. Meaning that you power them and set up a WiFi connection between your camera and your router.

[quote=“bbohannon, post:1, topic:184343”]A bit confused here. For installation of an IP camera, the videos I have seen show wiring an Ethernet cable from the router to the camera. For some reason, I was under the assumption these could be powered and not wired all the way to the router. Am I mistaken? I have an area of my house that would be damn near impossible to send an ethernet cable to. I was hoping to share power from an ourdoor light and this think would connect to my home’s wifi wireless.

Thanks,[/quote]

As he said there are WIFI IP camera’s also and that seems to be what your looking for. You also mentioned outdoor. Your going to find that those two things already are going to be difficult to find. Do research and don’t get suckered in like me using Foscams. Wifi was unreliable and I would loose picture after a few days and have to go unplug and plug back in. Also outdoor means outdoor don’t get indoor ratied for even under patio. The weather (even here in Los Angeles, California) was to much for my foscams. IR’s started to fail, plastic can’t hold up even when not in direct sun.

Wifi signal needs to be good to produce quality video. I’m sure a good camera is powerful enough but cheap ones like my foscam’s couldn’t produce the same picture quality and frames per sec that it could when plugged in vs. on wifi.

I have slowly switched my 1.3MP wireless indoor foscams out to 3MP wired POE (power over Ethernet) outdoor cameras. POE means you only need to run one cat5e cable to the camera. I run mine threw the attic under the eave where the cameras are. Power and everything runs threw the internet cable. Helps get rid of the extension cords and getting power to all my outdoor cameras.

Just do your homework and find a good camera that fits your budget.

Same here, I’m installed some indoor (plastic housings) cameras and some outdoor (aluminum housings) all PoE. I have one WiFi camera running at the front door (a TenVis) in a custom housing and so far its been very good for reliability and almost no dropped frames.

I’m running Cat 5e PoE throughout the house so I’ll pull in one additional in case I decide to/need to replace the TenVis with a PoE camera later.

I had originally planned to use all WiFi but by the time I figured out how to get power for the cameras to every location it was just as easy to run PoE.

Some need to be plugged into the router first to discover the camera and then after can be changed to a wireless state.

For some weird reason, my only camera (the Vera Vistacam PT) needed to use the cable that came with the camera. A different Cat 5 cable I had connected didn’t work. Shrug…

bbohannon,
Depending on where you live / are fitting it, don’t write off Foscam, I have an indoor F18908W mounted outside under my porch. It has been working fine out there using WiFi for at least a couple of years through ~20m and 4 brick walls - but then we don’t get the sun in UK like LA does :slight_smile:

Save your money on buying foscam and look into Hikvision or Dahua.

  • Garrett

[quote=“garrettwp, post:7, topic:184343”]Save your money on buying foscam and look into Hikvision or Dahua.

  • Garrett[/quote]

Is Hikvision really that much better than Foscam? Foscam goes on sell way more often than Hikvision and they are all compatible with Vera. I was looking to spend $70 - $90/camera and Hikvision is out of this range.

I also started out with Foscam’s as those were supported by Vera and am slowly replacing them with other brands when they come on sale.
I’m not really impressed with Foscam quality or customer service. I’m no longer worried about Vera support as I have farmed out my camera surveillance to a Windows server running the excellent Blue Iris software. Which there is a plug-in for so you can basically use any Blue Iris supported camera with Vera.

HD cams do ut a bit of a strain on the server so I just took advantage of a NewEgg deal on a Lenovo TS140 with Xeon CPU. That should take care of the load just fine and even allow upgrading a few more 640x480 ones to 720P.

[quote=“BOFH, post:9, topic:184343”]I also started out with Foscam’s as those were supported by Vera and am slowly replacing them with other brands when they come on sale.
I’m not really impressed with Foscam quality or customer service. I’m no longer worried about Vera support as I have farmed out my camera surveillance to a Windows server running the excellent Blue Iris software. Which there is a plug-in for so you can basically use any Blue Iris supported camera with Vera.

HD cams do ut a bit of a strain on the server so I just took advantage of a NewEgg deal on a Lenovo TS140 with Xeon CPU. That should take care of the load just fine and even allow upgrading a few more 640x480 ones to 720P.[/quote]

I have no current plans to buy a dedicated CPU to support my camera surveillance system. On that note, I did not take into consideration this “strain” you mention that it may have on the server. I have 25mbps internet and the video feed will be backed up via cloud network. I was looking into 720p real time video cameras. Will this be too much resolution for my needs?

The bandwidth is not really the issue. I have 10 camera’s, 3 of which are HD, running Wifi on a dedicated Wireless N router. The CPU utilization is for the motion detection, format conversion, recording and all that stuff BI does. BI is a very powerful program but also very CPU hungry. I installed it on my existing Media server (An older AMD Phenom 4 core system) and it’s running at around 60% CPU utilization. I can still also stream video but if I try to stream to more than one device, I’m getting hickups. Indicating the CPU is at times pegging out.

Have you had any problems with HD cameras on WIFI rather than PoE?

Not really. But I have them set to 10FPS to not overwhelm BlueIris with like 30FPS. For surveillance purposes, for me, 10FPS is enough.

I’m installing 11 more 1MP 720P cameras. I’ve configured them to 5fps, 512kb rate, 640x360 image and find this is quite sufficient for surveillance. Right now I have two of them up and running on BI and the BI CPU usage indicates 4-to-6%. When I initially installed the first two cameras I had them at the factory default, 1280x720, 30 FPS, full data rate and the CPU was constantly above 50%.

Image of Front Door camera at 640x360, 5fps, 512kb rate attached. This particular camera is the only WiFi camera, all others are PoE. It is a Tenvis TH671 in a custom housing (http://forum.micasaverde.com/index.php/topic,11964.msg200398.html#msg200398). I removed the camera module itself from the aluminum stand and installed it in a custom housing behind a 40mm UV filter to protect it. and works fine with rarely a dropped frame, The only problem with it is that it has severe pincushion problem