House wiring too thick (low gauge) to connect to Fibaro Dimmer

Hey guys,

I have a 2-wire system for lights throughout the house. I’m testing out the Fibaro Dimmer. The dimmer works great - my only issue concerns the connecting wires.

My home light switch wiring is quite thick and it’s almost impossible (or unsafe/possibility of dislodge) to connect them with the Fibaro dimmer. The only solution I’ve found was to use a coupler to a lesser gauge (much lesser - I’m here talking about Radio Shack 22AWG hookup wire).

I think for the Sx and S1/S2 connections this shouldn’t matter much as it passing a low voltage in any case as it just uses it as a ‘button’ and not as a traditional switch with 110V/220V passing through it. Right?

However, for the L, N and O, I’m basically downgrading the connection I’ve got from really thick wire to really thin wire using the couplers. Is this safe?

Please see the photo attached for a quick overview.

I’d appreciate any advice.

I haven’t asked my electrician yet as it’s a local holiday where I’m. I will check with him about the breaker amperage, etc and get his input on the matter as well.

My home light switch wiring is quite thick and it's almost impossible (or unsafe/possibility of dislodge) to connect them with the Fibaro dimmer. The only solution I've found was to use a coupler to a lesser gauge (much lesser - I'm here talking about Radio Shack 22AWG hookup wire).

Your hookup wires look pretty thin. Are they rated for the mains voltage? They must be!

I think for the Sx and S1/S2 connections this shouldn't matter much as it passing a low voltage in any case as it just uses it as a 'button' and not as a traditional switch with 110V/220V passing through it. Right?

The S inputs work at live voltage level. The current is very low so wire gauge is not an issue but the insulation must be rated for the supply voltage.

However, for the L, N and O, I'm basically downgrading the connection I've got from really thick wire to really thin wire using the couplers. Is this safe?

The wire must be suitable for the current and voltage. I have always been able to get a single 1.5 mm2 or two 1.0 mm2 wires into Fibaro terminals. Even the 1.0 mm2 is more than sufficient for a lighting circuit. Like you, I usually fit a terminal block to terminate the house cables and then use flexible stranded wires to the Fibaro module.

I usually use the wire sold for wiring-up equipment racks. This is type 2491X and the 1.0 mm2 size has 32 strands of 0.2 mm and is rated at 10 amps. When pushed, stripping a suitable three-core flexible cable is also a quick source.

You’re right, pretty thin and not rated for mains voltage.

The wire must be suitable for the current and voltage. I have always been able to get a single 1.5 mm2 or two 1.0 mm2 wires into Fibaro terminals. Even the 1.0 mm2 is more than sufficient for a lighting circuit. Like you, I usually fit a terminal block to terminate the house cables and then use flexible stranded wires to the Fibaro module.

I usually use the wire sold for wiring-up equipment racks. This is type 2491X and the 1.0 mm2 size has 32 strands of 0.2 mm and is rated at 10 amps. When pushed, stripping a suitable three-core flexible cable is also a quick source.

If I understand correctly, a 3-core flexible cable is like the one that comes with extension cords or appliances with three wires inside for L, N and E (see pic attached pls). I’ve got a spare extension cord lying around. I guess I could strip it out and use any of the three wires inside, safe in the knowledge that it’s mains rated? If I’m buying a roll of this 3-core (which is easily available to me), what would be a suitable amp rating be? 10, 15 or 20?

Thanks for your help, Rex.

If I understand correctly, a 3-core flexible cable is like the one that comes with extension cords or appliances with three wires inside for L, N and E (see pic attached pls). I've got a spare extension cord lying around. I guess I could strip it out and use any of the three wires inside, safe in the knowledge that it's mains rated? If I'm buying a roll of this 3-core (which is easily available to me), what would be a suitable amp rating be? 10, 15 or 20?

Correct. Just like your picture. The commonly available ones are 6 amp (0.75 mm[sup]2[/sup]), 10 amp (1.0 mm[sup]2[/sup]) and 15 amp (1.5 mm[sup]2[/sup]). I normally use 1.0 mm[sup]2[/sup] for lighting circuits but any of these would do. It is easier to fit two 0.75 mm[sup]2[/sup] wires into a Fibaro terminal but I usually use a single 1.0 mm[sup]2[/sup] wire for each terminal and join them at the connector strip.

See if your electrical store has any 4-core or 5-core flexible cable. This is sold for connecting the motorized valves in heating systems. The stuff I have has brown, blue, green, white and black wires. The extra colours are handy for indicating switched live wires to avoid confusion.

Thanks again, Rex. Appreciate the help. I’ll be using 10 amp since my switches are also rated at 10 amp.

Regards,
Hisham

If I’m using 10A rated flexible wire (1.0mm) and the connector strip is rated for 15A or 30A, is it ok to use it to connect the 1.0mm wire to the thick house wiring (or to join together 2x1.0m wires or 2xthick house wires)? My electrician says it should be fine since a lower amperage (10A) and is feeding into a higher rated connector strip (15A).

Thanks

If I’m using 10A rated flexible wire (1.0mm) and the connector strip is rated for 15A or 30A, is it ok to use it to connect the 1.0mm wire to the thick house wiring (or to join together 2x1.0m wires or 2xthick house wires)? My electrician says it should be fine since a lower amperage (10A) and is feeding into a higher rated connector strip (15A).

Thanks[/quote]

The connector strip should be rated high enough for the power circuit in which it is used. If the circuit breaker or fuse is 15A, use a 15A connector strip. If you are connecting a thinner wire to a larger diameter connector, double the stripped end of the wire over so that it makes a better contact.