google @ home

You have to wonder why they would develop yet another wireless protocol versus using an existing zwave/zigbee one. Probably to follow the open licensing standard so they can GPL it…

Latency?

They are using RF4CE. which uses a Zigbee radio but doesn’t require all the horsepower and memory from the MCU.

The other interesting/ odd thing is that the example they demonstrated was that the light bulb has the radio in it versus the lamp/socket/plug… Meaning that you have to ‘buy’ the radio every time you replace a bulb?

According to Lighting Science demos Android @ Home bulbs, promises dead-simple home automation (hands-on) | Engadget it will be a 900 MHz protocol (RF4CE is 2.4Gz?). I expect there will be a lot of options in the future including wall switches. I am really interested seeing what’s inside the Tungsten devices. Seems like an Android phone with no screen. It will be interesting to see see the interaction between an Android Tablet, Tungsten Device, Google TV, and Android Accessories. Google has all the ingredients to make a truly connected home ;D.

yeah, but not good for those of us who have already committed dosh to Z Wave devices, especially if Google’s initiative really takes off, it won’t be good for Z Wave or Zigbee for that matter.

Maybe. It should all be open source, so is there any reason why there can’t be a Google@Home to Z-wave bridge? In fact I bet the vera could act as that bridge via a plug-in.

if it’s totally cheap then who cares if they stick it in the bulb- if a 5 year bulb costs an extra 5 bucks to include the chip then it is still a better deal then spending 40-90 bucks for a switch.

and in 5 years when the bulb dies one can see what the current state is then and then buying something else.

that said I’m sure that being open source someone will make switches, outlets, etc like there are for z-wave, x-10, zigbee, or insteon now. I think the point of showing off a disposable bulb (albeit a long lasting one) with the chip was to show just how cheap it will be to include in stuff.

exactly- it wont be good for z-wave or zigbee, but doesn’t mean mcv is in trouble. If it takes off (IF) and it’s open source why wouldn’t the people making z-wave dongle make google dongles and potentially more profit since they dont need to pay zensys. Vera could just have a dongle and an option like they do with insteon/x-10 now.

if it’s totally cheap then who cares if they stick it in the bulb- if a 5 year bulb costs an extra 5 bucks to include the chip then it is still a better deal then spending 40-90 bucks for a switch.

and in 5 years when the bulb dies one can see what the current state is then and then buying something else.

that said I’m sure that being open source someone will make switches, outlets, etc like there are for z-wave, x-10, zigbee, or insteon now. I think the point of showing off a disposable bulb (albeit a long lasting one) with the chip was to show just how cheap it will be to include in stuff.[/quote]

Acording to this article…
http://news.cnet.com/8301-11128_3-20061566-54.html

The networked bulbs will be available by the end of the year at the same cost as their general-purpose LEDs, for which prices range from under $20 to about $35 for a 60-watt equivalent.

So the costs will work well for smallish numbers of lights on a given circuit, but as that gets larger, the dedicated switch model is cheaper (unless you’re switching to LED Anyhow, and don’t mind single-sourcing your bulbs in the short-term.

It’ll be interesting to see how they’re expecting this all to interact with the standard house wiring, and a “regular” light switch on the wall.

It also makes you wonder if you’ll be able to control each light, on a multi-light section, independently of one-another… could make for some interesting power saving ops.

As long as someone makes the RF Dongle, with a “reasonable” event-driven API, we should be set from Vera to the components of whatever’s next. This would be similar to having two Z-Wave controllers in a house that don’t talk to each other, but talk to the discrete Lights etc on the home HouseId. Presumably higher-level API’s will be available also for better integration, but these things take time.

The more interesting part will be how Open Google’s controller framework is… how easy it will be to introduce things into their end of the equation, that talk to other controllers, such as Vera, for Z-Wave, and integrating all components natively into Google’s device itself.

At some point, they’ll make a reasonable Home-Control app for all their Android-based devices (Phone, Tablet, TV), and have an packaged/integrated end-to-end solution that’ll be hard to beat. Their components are definitely aligning, so it’ll be interesting to see if the Hardware (Switch, Outlet, Audio, etc) vendors will also.

The Music part of their story certainly peaked my interest, so I went and bought a Nook Color to hack just to see what it’s like.